It’s crazy to watch movies that were made decades ago and see just how accurate they were in predicting the future. Today, we are going to dive deep into the movie Gattaca, which premiered in 1997.

 

Here’s a brief synopsis on Gattaca: It’s a science fiction film that showcases a society in the future that utilizes reproductive technology and genetic engineering in order to produce genetically enhanced human beings. Essentially, by using technology, scientists are able to select certain genes to ensure that individuals are born with more desirable physical and psychological traits.

 

The movie follows the protagonist, Vincent Freeman, who is considered “rare” since he was born without the use of genetic modification (“faith babies”). Since his parents chose to forgo genetic manipulation, Freeman is born with a much shorter estimated lifespan, manic depression, and ADHD, among other things.

 

Eventually, Freeman goes on to meet Jerome Morrow, how is considered mentally ideal. Unfortunately for Morrow (and probably many others), Morrow is paralyzed because he tried to commit suicide after a loss in a swim meet — he was destined to succeed from birth, so for him to fail at something; he’d rather take his own life.

 

Long story short, Freeman and Morrow meet, and Morrow allows for Freeman to take over his identity — he provides Freeman with everything he may need (genetic material, blood, urine, etc.). Freeman even undergoes plastic surgery to change his physical appearance. He does all of this because he wants to work for the Gattaca Aerospace Corporation.

 

At the end of the day, Freeman is going to be launched into space to visit one of Saturn’s moons — he constantly has to undergo blood and urine samples as well as physical tests. He has one last urine test before the launch when he realizes he’s run out of Morrow’s genetic material. He submits his own urine and surprisingly still gets to go through with the launch. It’s because the man that was going over the test results has a son that is a faith baby, and he wants his son to be able to have the same opportunities that Freeman has.

 

Freeman makes it into space, while Morrow ends up committing suicide and that’s the end of the film.

 

Now, looking at our own society — we have made advancements in genetic manipulation. Would you choose your child’s traits or would you leave it up to chance?